Joining Us

Membership runs from April 1st – March 31st each year

If you would like to join Tenby Aces CC, please follow this link where you can join Tenby Aces online.

By joining, you agree to following the safety and wellbeing guidlines below.

Safety and Well Being

Cycling, Swimming and running

It is important for members to understand that the club is a voluntary organisation that does not have employers, employees or a place of occupation to manage. We are a group of like minded people coming together to enjoy the benefits of group activity whether it be cycling, running or swimming. We do have a committee and we do have individuals who give up their time freely to lead different activities in all three disciplines. During organised training events the leader will take a few moments to lead through simple safety briefings; please listen, but the advice is not exhaustive and so always be aware of your environment and what you are attempting to achieve. Monitor your activity and environment and assess the risks continuously “dynamically”.

From time to time we organise training and events for the purpose of introduction and improvement. It is important that all members understand that participation in such activities is done solely at the individuals own risk. To that end it is important that individuals take responsibility to ensure that they have the correct equipment for the correct event and the correct environment; as important is the individuals knowledge of their own ability; both in skill, fitness and health. If in doubt seek advice from your medical practitioner for health matters. In relation to the three disciplines guidance is always available from more informed club members; disseminating knowledge is all part of the ethos of the club. The internet is a good source of information for all three disciplines. PLEASE DO NOT PUT YOURSELF AT RISK; IT COULDS AFFECT THOSE AROUND YOU AS WELL AS YOURSELF.

You are reminded that the Club does not hold insurance to cover personal injury or public liability. No matter what your chosen event is, you are strongly advised to get public liability insurance and perhaps personal insurance. If you cause an incident which results in loss to another (material or injury) then you might be liable in the civil courts.

“How do civil law and health and safety law apply?

Understanding which type of law applies:

Concerns often arise when people confuse civil law obligations with an organisation’s duties under health and safety law.

This section clarifies the differences between the two types of law and how health and safety law applies to voluntary organisations.

Civil law and the duty of care:

Under the common law, voluntary organisations and individual volunteers have a duty of care to each other and others who may be affected by their activities. Where something goes wrong, individuals may, in some cases, sue for damages using the civil law if they are injured as a result of another person’s negligence.

But, for a negligence claim to succeed, the injured person must show that the defendant had a duty to take reasonable care towards them, and they have suffered the injury through a breach of that duty. The injured person must also show that the type of loss or injury for which damages are being claimed was a foreseeable result of the breach of the duty.

Liability in individual cases is a matter for the courts, depending on all the circumstances of the case and the actions and standards it is reasonable to expect from each of the parties involved. If the court decides that a particular claim does not have merit, then it will reject it. It can also reduce any damages awarded to reflect the extent of any contributory negligence on the part of the injured person.

Health and safety law:

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (HSW Act) is criminal law aimed at protecting employees and others who may be affected by work activities. It is enforced mainly by HSE and local authorities.

Health and safety legislation does not, in general, impose duties upon someone who is not an employer, self-employed or an employee.

It is not possible to sue for damages under the HSW Act itself although a breach of health and safety regulations may be cited as part of a civil claim for compensation based on a breach of statutory duty.

HSE and local authority health and safety officers have no power to investigate incidents or pursue enforcement action in relation to most purely voluntary activities (subject to limited exceptions such as where a volunteer is in control of non-domestic premises).” (Taken from the HSE web site)

 As can be seen above; we as a club are not covered by The Health and Safety at Work Act. However as a club providing a voluntary service we do have an obligation to ensure that we are mindful of our responsibilities in relation to a “duty of care”. To that end that is why we take reasonable steps to provide meaning information to members in written form and brief groups prior to activities. That is why we have club rules and etiquette and that is why we do not apply the “common sense” principle; we do not assume that individuals are equipped with the knowledge to avoid hazards and accidents.

Please read the information provided when joining our club and please listen to the briefings so that we can enjoy our chosen activity without fear of someone else’s folly causing us or others harm.

Tenby Aces Club Rides

The Aim

The aim of Tenby Aces is to cater for participants of all abilities; whether young or old, male or female.

Our one goal in cycling is that you enjoy your cycling. Tenby Aces Cycling Club wants riders to gain maximum enjoyment from their group rides whether highly energetic or social.

Club rides are for members to ride in a group and for several reasons; social, safety, sporting, fitness and of course if new to the area you won’t get lost.

By riding in a group you learn road skills and are able to chat to more experienced riders. Generally speaking it is the best place to learn about cycling.

Be Prepared

Wear plenty of warm clothes; you can always take layers off if too warm. Carry the following with you:

  • A rain jacket
  • A pump
  • Essential tools
  • Spare tubes
  • Food
  • Plenty of drink

Also carry a mobile phone and worth having a little money for a tea stop or emergency supplies.

Keep your bike in good condition and replace any worn out parts. The group will help if something goes wrong but will not be best pleased if the problem was caused by poor maintenance.

Mudguards (winter riding) are preferable; they prevent you getting wet and dirty and also reduce the amount that you deposit on the rider behind.

Cycling helmets must be worn on Tenby Aces rides – they provide additional protection against head injuries.

As members of Tenby Aces Cycling Club you are ambassadors of the club every time you get on your bike. It is our reasonability to set a good example to other cyclists, particularly young riders, by always complying with the Highway Code. Do not jump red lights, even if clear, and do not use your mobile phone whilst cycling.

All riders take part in the group runs at their own risk. Those risks can never be totally eliminated but can be minimised by following the laws of the road and the rules and etiquette of the Club.

Senior Club members will be happy to offer general guidance; they will politely point out any deviations to the rider (s) concerned and seek compliance.

Consider your own insurance needs. In particular it is highly recommended that you ensure that you have Third Party (Public Liability) insurance that covers you whilst cycling. The Club has such a policy to cover claims against the Club and it’s Officers but does not cover individual riders. You shouldconsider joining either British Cycling of the Cycling Touring Club – membership includes both Third Party insurance and free legal assistance.

Group Rides

It may be necessary to have more than one group depending on the numbers and ability of the riders who turn up.

Each group should stick together (see Club Run Etiquette) with a more experienced rider at the front and rear. A decent gap should be allowed between groups to minimise the nuisance to other road users.

The benefits of riding in a group are more than just social; you will cover more ground with less effort in a group, saving around 20% of your energy when sitting in the bunch. So stay close to the rider in front to maximise the slipstream and allow riders around you to also use it to best effect.

When you first ride in a group you may be slightly unsure as to what is going on, where you should be riding in the formation or who is in charge. There are a few rules to riding in a group safely and effectively. There is also some basic etiquette you need to know.

Club Run Etiquette

First and foremost – You must comply with the Highway Code at all Times – Do not jump red lights.

  • Find out the route (See website / Ask someone / Listen to leader), understand the route, stick to the route.
  • Ride steadily; keep a steady line and constant speed while in a group. Any sudden change is magnified as it reaches riders at the back.
  • Ride two abreast where it is safe to do so but always be prepared to single out when necessary. Ride immediately behind the rider in front – do not overlap either forwards or sideways. Never ride more than two abreast.
  • Keep together – after any interruption in the ride such as road junctions, roundabouts, stopping for any reason, after a climb or descent, the lead riders should make sure that all riders are back in the group before moving off at normal pace. It is okay to keep moving; it is preferable to keep moving but slowly until everyone is back together. If riders are a long way down, having been delayed at a junction or traffic lights, then stopping is an option to consider. When the route involves negotiating roundabouts, road junctions, etc. then waiting at a corner may be necessary to ensure all riders follow the correct route. If gaps appear in the group, warn the riders in front and request them to ease down. Avoid letting large gaps open.
  • Front riders are the eyes of the group and should warn of hazards ahead, change of speed, change of direction and approaching vehicles (see Warning Calls) – warnings should be both verbal and by pointing and try to give them in plenty of time.
  • Treat members of the group and other road users with courtesy. Acknowledge with a wave courteous behaviour by other road users.
  • Do not react to bad driving incidents with gestures or provoke retaliation. Remember a road rage motorist has a one tonne weapon!
  • Do not ‘wave through’ a following vehicle that is waiting to overtake – let the driver make this decision. This will avoid the risk of being held responsible if the overtaking results in any form of accident.
  • Ride with the group that best suits your ability. It is usually better to start low and build up.
  • It is important that no-one be left alone at the back or even be dropped. The lead riders may send everyone ahead whilst they assist the rider at the back and regroup at a pre-arranged destination.
  • If you find yourself having an ‘off day’ (we all have them) make sure to let the group know if you are intending to sit up and wait for another group.
  • If for some reason you do find yourself on your own then please stick to the route – you’ll find the group waiting for you somewhere safe down the road.

We want all our members to benefit from being part of this Cycling Club. The above guidelines are there to help and enhance the enjoyment for all.

Remember – noone gets left behind!

Warning Calls when Riding in a Group

These calls and signals are universal to all experienced cyclists – please use them at the appropriate times: –

“Car Up” There is a vehicle coming up behind the group.

“Car Down” or “Car Ahead” There is a vehicle approaching towards the front of the group.

“Single Out” A call from riders at the back of the group when a vehicle is unable to pass the 2 abreast column safely.

“Clear” and “Car” on This call lets following riders know at junctions, when the the “Left/Right” group is joining or crossing another road.

“Pothole” Any pothole that can cause a rider to fall. If possible indicate where it is so that following riders can steer away from it and not into it. Do this by either pointing or adding to the call “on the left (or right)”.

“On the Left/Right” A general warning of some kind of hazard – usually parked cars or pedestrians. For hazards on the left an alternative warning is to put your left hand bend your back, pointing to the right, away from the hazard. Give way to pedestrians – they can feel intimidated by cyclists just as we sometimes feel intimidated by motorists.

“Stopping” “Slowing” “Easy” Right hand moving in an up and down action. If you brake without letting those behind you know your intention they can easily run into you.

“Puncture” Let the others know and they will wait while you repair it.

“Horse(s)” The group is about to pass horses and special care is needed. Pass as widely as possible, make sure that both the horse and rider are aware of your presence and if you are approaching from behind – call out. Keep pedalling slowly as you pass to keep noise from your freewheel and gears to a minimum. Pay attention to any request by the horse rider – they know the temperament of the horse and its likely reaction to a group of brightly clad cyclists.

Finally – Let others know if you are unable to keep up, have a problem or have decided to leave the group. Always pass the instructions along, if a rider cannot keep up the leader needs to know.

Tenby Aces Running

Running is the second discipline supported by Tenby Aces Cycling Club. During the year training sessions will be commissioned to allow for the development of skills; technique and equipment. The venue and nature of the training will be announced via the club web site. It is important that all members who participate in the sessions understand the general terms and conditions as set out for all three disciplines.

It is important that participants have due cognisance of the following.

  1. Be aware of the prevailing weather conditions prior to preparing for the training session.
  2. Ensure that your foot ware is fit for purpose; suitable for the terrain in which you are going to be training.
  3. Ensure that your clothing is suitable; fits correctly, not too hot not too cold. Consider outer garment for cool down sessions. Sudden chill can cause multiple problems.
  4. Ensure that you are suitable energised and hydrated for the session and that you have sufficient resources with you to keep topped up “bonking out” is not good.
  5. If designated training is scheduled to take place on the public highway then ensure that you adhere to the highway code. Ensure that you have hi-viz clothing or jackets and a form of suitable illumination to see and be seen when necessary!
  6. If carrying an injury then ensure you know your boundaries and inform the session facilitator of any concerns you might have; if in doubt drop out!
  7. Ensure that you listen to the briefings given by the session facilitator; it is for your safety and that of others.
  8. The sessions will be developed to improve performance via technique. Personal endurance training (extended long runs) should be undertaken in your own time at your own pace. Our sessions are designed to allow all levels to develop within a friendly “Trotts” like environment; learning off each other.

Tenby Aces Swimming

Swimming training is the third discipline supported by Tenby Cycling Club. During the year training sessions will be commissioned to allow for the development of skills; technique and equipment. The venue and nature of the training will be announced via the club web site. It is important that all members who participate in the sessions understand the general terms and conditions as set out for all three disciplines.

We will endeavour to offer facilities at the both the local swimming pool and also open water (the sea). All this depends on the time of the year. Again the sessions will be coordinated by a facilitator.

It is important that participants have due cognisance of the following.

  1. Ensure that you have suitable equipment; swim ware, goggles, ear plugs, nose clips. Designed for the venue; pool or sea!
  2. Ensure that your clothing is suitable; fits correctly, not too hot, not too cold. Consider out garment for cool down sessions after swim. Sudden chill can cause multiple problems.
  3. Ensure that you are suitable energised and hydrated for the session and that you have sufficient resources with you to keep topped up “bonking out” is not good.
  4. If designated training is scheduled to take place in the sea, ensure that you have hi-viz identification and a form of distress alert! These elements will be dictated at the time of the session.
  5. If carrying an injury then ensure you know your boundaries and inform the session facilitator of any concerns you might have; if in doubt drop out!
  6. The sessions will be developed to improve performance via technique. Personal endurance training (extended long swims) should be undertaken in your own time at your own pace.
    Our sessions are designed to allow all levels to develop within a friendly “Dolphins” like environment; learning off each other. We have some very experienced swimmers amongst our club.
  7. Ensure that you listen to the safety briefing given by the session facilitator; these are club sessions and so no one should be left alone. The briefings will differ according to the environment (pool or sea). If in the pool then you must adhere to the rules set out by the service provider. The sea is a dangerous environment and so it is imperative that a buddy buddy system is utilised. No one should swim alone.
  8. Due cognisance should be given to sea safety. Be aware find out more via the RNLI web site, know your stuff. Tides, cold and fatigue can kill. Don’t be out of your depth!